Speed your squid server Using Google Public DNS

Posted: December 17, 2009 in archlinux, Debian, Freebsd, Slackware

This is new and realistic !!!!

Google is slowly take over the world…

if you wanna speed up your squid box than use google public dns.

Google Public DNS IP addresses

The Google Public DNS IP addresses are as follows:

  • 8.8.8.8
  • 8.8.4.4

use it in squid

pico /etc/squid/squid.cof

dns_nameserver 8.8.8.8   8.8.4.4

than add it with your /etc/resolv.conf

[root@bsd ~]# pico /etc/resolv.conf
nameserver      8.8.4.4
nameserver      8.8.8.8

test and you will see the different.

############################################################################

Pick from google web site

http://code.google.com/speed/public-dns/docs/using.html

############################################################################

CHANGE GOOGLE DNS

Microsoft Windows

DNS settings are specified in the TCP/IP Properties window for the selected network connection.

Example: Changing DNS server settings on Microsoft Windows Vista

  1. Go the Control Panel.
  2. Click Network and Internet, then Network and Sharing Center, then Manage network connections.
  3. Select the connection for which you want to configure Google Public DNS. For example:
    • To change the settings for an Ethernet connection, right-click Local Area Connection, and click Properties.
    • To change the settings for a wireless connection, right-click Wireless Network Connection, and click Properties.

    If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

  4. Select the Networking tab. Under This connection uses the following items, click Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4), and then click Properties.
  5. Click Advanced and select the DNS tab. If there are any DNS server IP addresses listed there, write them down for future reference, and remove them from this window.
  6. Click OK.
  7. Select Use the following DNS server addresses. If there are any IP addresses listed in the Preferred DNS server or Alternate DNS server, write them down for future reference.
  8. Replace those addresses with the IP addresses of the Google DNS servers: 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4.
  9. Restart the connection you selected in step 3.
  10. Test that your setup is working correctly; see Testing your new settings below.
  11. Repeat the procedure for additional network connections you want to change.

Mac OS X

DNS settings are specified in the Network window.

Example: Changing DNS server settings on Mac OS 10.5

  1. From the Apple menu, click System Preferences, then click Network.
  2. If the lock icon in the lower left-hand corner of the window is locked, click the icon to make changes, and when prompted to authenticate, enter your password.
  3. Select the connection for which you want to configure Google Public DNS. For example:
    • To change the settings for an Ethernet connection, select Built-In Ethernet, and click Advanced.
    • To change the settings for a wireless connection, select Airport, and click Advanced.
  4. Select the DNS tab.
  5. Click + to replace any listed addresses with, or add, the Google IP addresses at the top of the list: 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4.
  6. Click Apply and OK.
  7. Test that your setup is working correctly; see Testing your new settings below.
  8. Repeat the procedure for additional network connections you want to change.

Linux

In most modern Linux distributions, DNS settings are configured through Network Manager.

Example: Changing DNS server settings on Ubuntu

  1. In the System menu, click Preferences, then click Network Connections.
  2. Select the connection for which you want to configure Google Public DNS. For example:
    • To change the settings for an Ethernet connection, select the Wired tab, then select your network interface in the list. It is usually called eth0.
    • To change the settings for a wireless connection, select the Wireless tab, then select the appropriate wireless network.
  3. Click Edit, and in the window that appears, select the IPv4 Settings tab.
  4. If the selected method is Automatic (DHCP), open the dropdown and select Automatic (DHCP) addresses only instead. If the method is set to something else, do not change it.
  5. In the DNS servers field, enter the Google Public DNS IP addresses, separated by a space: 8.8.8.8  8.8.4.4
  6. Click Apply to save the change. If you are prompted for a password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
  7. Test that your setup is working correctly; see Testing your new settings below.
  8. Repeat the procedure for additional network connections you want to change.

If your distribution doesn’t use Network Manager, your DNS settings are specified in /etc/resolv.conf.

Example: Changing DNS server settings on a Debian server

  1. Edit /etc/resolv.conf:
    sudo vi /etc/resolv.conf
  2. If any nameserver lines appear, write down the IP addresses for future reference.
  3. Replace the nameserver lines with, or add, the following lines:
    nameserver 8.8.8.8
    nameserver 8.8.4.4
  4. Save and exit.
  5. Restart any Internet clients you are using.
  6. Test that your setup is working correctly; see Testing your new settings below.

Additionally, if you are using DHCP client software that overwrites the settings in /etc/resolv.conf, you will need to set up the client accordingly by editing the client’s configuration file.

Example: Configuring DHCP client sofware on a Debian server

  1. Back up /etc/resolv.conf:
    sudo cp /etc/resolv.conf /etc/resolv.conf.auto
  2. Edit /etc/dhcp3/dhclient.conf:
    sudo vi /etc/dhcp3/dhclient.conf
  3. If there is a line containing domain-name-servers, write down the IP addresses for future reference.
  4. Replace that line with, or add, the following line:
    prepend domain-name-servers 8.8.8.8, 8.8.4.4;
  5. Save and exit.
  6. Restart any Internet clients you are using.
  7. Test that your setup is working correctly; see Testing your new settings below.

Routers

Every router uses a different user interface for configuring DNS server settings; we provide only a generic procedure below. For more information, please consult your router documentation.

Comments
  1. When i visit a blog, chances are that i get disappointed. Regarding your blog,I have to say that you have done a good job here.

  2. dial says:

    tnx man
    ps.
    dns_nameserverS
    🙂

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